We Were Meant to be Teachers!

Classroom Management Strategies and other Teacher Worthy Ideas

Rich-Poor Achievement Gap is Lowering in U.S.

What about the educational achievement gap that has been quite wide between the rich and poor students in U.S.?
Good news!  The gap is lowering.

According to a recent article in Bloomberg Markets:

“Between 2006 and 2015, the percentage of so-called resilient students in the U.S. – teens from the bottom of the socio-economic ladder who manage to outperform their peers and rank among the top quarter of students internationally – grew by 12.3 points, the largest margin of the 72 countries and economies surveyed.”

“Of course family wealth and background still influence academic achievement. Disadvantaged students in the U.S. were 2.5 times more likely to be low performers than advantaged students last year, according to the OECD report released Tuesday. But the correlation is decreasing. In 2015, 11 percent of the variation in American students’ test scores could be explained by their socio-economic status. That’s down from 17 percent a decade ago, suggesting that education outcomes are increasingly the result of students’ abilities and effort rather than their personal circumstances and family background.”

As one of my former Principals used to tell us – personal circumstances and family background should NOT be used as an excuse for low student educational performance.  Again, consider Dr. Ben Carson’s family experience and success!  Look at all the NFL players who have graduate degrees but had lived in poor neighborhoods as youngsters!

Here’s the link to read something positive about our public schools.  Title 1 Programs are showing great results!

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-12-06/rich-poor-achievement-gap-is-narrowing-in-american-education?cmpid=socialflow-twitter-business&utm_content=business&utm_campaign=socialflow-organic&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social

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